Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed

Art, Museum, show and exhibition
Munch-thestorm

The Storm, 1893, Edvard Munch

Munch-madonna

Madonna, 1895-97, Edvard Munch

Munch-despair

Despair, 1894, Edvard Munch

I was lucky to notice The Met Breuer was showing works of Norwegian artist, Edvard Munch (1863–1944). The title of the show is Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed which was the title of his one of his self-portrait.

Munch’s works are well known for his depictions of human anxiety. Because in modern society, everyone seems living with depression, I think his works reveal one aspect of our modern society. Thus his works are very contemporary.

His most famous work is The Scream, which was not there. It was very disappointing. However, I enjoyed the show. Munch is one of my favorite artists but I didn’t have a chance to see his works at the same time.

 

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Michelangelo at Met

Art, drawing, Museum, show and exhibition

I went to “the must-see” show, Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer at Metropolitan Museum. It was very successful show. So many people! Met announced that the 10th most visited exhibition in the museum’s history. It’s brought more than 700,000 visitors for three months. I was one of them. It was so many (but not too many) works. They show not only his works but also other artists who worked with him. I’ve never get tired of seeing those masterpieces! Just beautiful.

Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, 1475–1564). Bacchanal of Children. Red chalk. Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017

Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, 1475–1564). Studies for Christ in the Pietà of Úbeda for Sebastiano del Piombo. Black chalk. Musée du Louvre, Département des Arts Graphiques, Paris (716)

Kathe Burkhart show at Mary Boone gallery

Art, New York Art, protest, show and exhibition

I went to see Kathe Burkhart show at Mary Boone gallery. Though I missed Women’s march, I could make this feminist artist’s show.

In one word, I would say her work is bold. I love that straightforwardness. I also love the way she uses collage. I think the materials of   the collage connects between visual image and reality of our life.

Blueballs_Burkhart

Blueballs: from the Liz Taylor Series, 2007

Get the Fuck Out_Burkhart

Get the Fuck Out: from the Liz Taylor Series, 2017

Francis Picabia at MOMA

Art, MoMA, Museum

I went to see the show,  Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round so Our Thoughts Can Change Direction at MOMA.

I knew Francis Picabia but didn’t know much about his works. It was amazing to see entire his career! Its styles ranged widely—and wildly—from Impressionism to radical abstraction, from Dadaist provocation to pseudo-classicism, and from photo-based realism to art informel. He mastered each style. The show looked like works of ten different artists. I love the fact that his works has the sense of millennium.

rancis-picabia-la-nuit-espagnole-the-spanish-night-1922

rancis Picabia. La Nuit espagnole (The Spanish Night). 1922

francis-picabia-portrait-dun-couple-portrait-of-a-couple

Francis Picabia. Portrait d’un couple (Portrait of a Couple)

francis-picabia-portrait-dun-couple-portrait-of-a-couple

Francis Picabia. La Source (The Spring). 1912.

 

Japanese painting and calligraphy

Art, Japan

I went to Japanese painting, Nihonga and calligraphy, Syodou show at Gallery MC. Most of the paintings are steel life. And the subject matters are nature like flowers. The artist, Mieko Arai has a long Nihonga career. I asked her if she paint without seeing real objects. Her answer was “nature is the greatest teacher.”  You can learn art by seeing nature. So, painting from real object is crucial part of Nihonga. I think this is an essence of Japanese art.